Can a common goal be the catalyst to new relationships?

Guest Blog – Written by Aidan Carswell

I believe it is.

So where did It all start?

My journey started when I was 11, both of my parents worked full time and as a result I spent a lot of my time after school around at friends houses or childminders, I loved it.

It opened my eyes up to activities and opportunities that I would never have thought of pursuing. One of these happened to be the wonderful world of golf!

One warm summer day after school, my friend’s mum took me to Ripon city golf club’s Driving range while her child had a lesson at the tennis centre. That was it. I was hooked or as some may say “he’s got the bug”.

I would beg to be dropped off at the golf club throughout the summer holidays where I would practise and play with my friends.

Saturdays were competition days, a chance to get your handicap down and maybe even take some money from the older guys (everyone was an older guy compared to me).

One of my first or it could have been my first ever Saturday competition, I was very anxious and nervous. I didn’t know anybody. I wandered up to the first tee with my tiny little golf clubs and a nervous smile on my face expecting to see three stern looking old men who didn’t really want to play with a little kid who’s just learning.

What I found was the exact opposite!

Three guys stood with big smiles on their faces having a laugh and a joke, they made me feel comfortable instantly. I felt even more comfortable when I watched two of them hit their balls straight into the water.

The one guy who had hit the green was Founder of Golf in Society Anthony Blackburn.

Although it turned out to be the only green, he hit that day, he made my first experience of competitive golf a fond memory, for this I am forever grateful.

I came in and out of golf through my teenage years, trial of life kept me away from golf for around 6 years. An outcome from my challenges had been the realisation that if I was to spend my time doing anything, it should have a positive impact on someone else.

I then decided to play golf again, I headed up to RCGC where it felt like I had never been away. One Saturday I headed to the tee where I noticed I was playing Anthony again, as if my golf life was coming full circle.

During the round Anthony told me about his Social Mission, Golf in Society. (https://golfinsociety.com/about/)

I was very interested in getting involved, this later led to me getting invited to some of the dementia & Parkinson’s golf days that Golf in Society run at Rudding Park Golf Club in North Yorkshire. (https://golfinsociety.com/current-golf-therapy-sessions/)

My experience was for no better word to describe “wholesome”.

The first thing I noticed was the genuine compassion and empathy that everyone had for one another, The outcome being an extremely enjoyable day where I got to spend time with people in their later stage of life who had been given obstacles that would only deteriorate and debilitate as time went on such as dementia & Parkinson’s.

Throughout the day I noticed some key aspects that really stuck with me.

Firstly, the warm welcoming atmosphere created by Anthony (Founder/Golf activator) as people arrived at the club, the caregivers left their loved ones in his capable hands while they went over to the clubhouse for tea and cakes.

The golfers then entered a world of banter, comradery and friendly competitiveness.

There was a range of golfers, from people who had always played golf to people completely new to the game.

I got to watch how a new client was integrated into the group and how the companionship of new friends really had an impact on him. The following week he was back again, and the group had gained another member. Proving to me how valuable the service that Golf in Society really is.

The Common Goal

I was aware of the benefits golf had on my own personal mental health and wellbeing, the feeling of bettering myself and the constant strive for improvement gave me a sense of purpose on the course.

The outdoors, nature and tranquillity gave me a place to reflect on my goals.

After spending a few days helping Anthony run sessions I realised we had a common goal.

To make a positive impact on society.

This solidified in my mind that Anthony’s & Golf in society’s mission was something I needed to be part of.

Although the way that I do that is always evolving.

I really can’t put into words the value of the service that Golf in society provides and the significant impact it has on the individuals involved and as you zoom out, the impact it has on how we approach helping those that have some difficulties later in life.

It truly is a social mission.

It truly highlighted for me the importance of making those later stages in life meaningful and purposeful.

To this day I feel motivated to contribute to the social movement that Anthony has started, and I will continue to do so.

Feel free to follow my journey as I navigate my way through life.

Written by Aidan Carswell

Join The Club – Golf In Society Leads The Way

The last place many families living with dementia would think of going for an enjoyable day out would be their local golf club. An uncomfortable truth for the golf industry is that public perceptions of golf clubs remain unchanged despite numerous campaigns to change them.

That’s why we’re so proud of leading the way in proving how much golf can offer families facing the challenges of dementia.

We’ve broken down so many barriers along the way and have many more to overcome.

The good news is that our pioneering work is gathering momentum and proving how golf clubs can benefit from engaging more with their local community.


Here’s a great feature by the Alzheimer’s Society about our work and how we’ve made golf the highlight of the week for the families we support.

Who would have thought it would be happening at their local golf club?

https://www.alzheimers.org.uk/dementia-together-magazine/apr-may-2019/join-club-golf-society

More Proof Why Golf Is A Wonder Drug

Who would have know that golf is one of the new wonder drugs. It has the power to reduce chronic illness, improve healthy ageing, reduce loneliness, give people a sense of purpose and reduce the inactivity timebomb facing our nation.

A few weeks ago I had the pleasure of listening to the attached presentation by Dr William Bird from Intelligent Health. It was the most compelling and thought-provoking medical presentation I’ve ever witnessed. A wonder drug called FITERIX was introduced to us that has all the necessary ingredients to transform the health & wellbeing of our ageing popualtion.

During the presentation we all took part in a poll as to how much moderate exercise we had completed the day before. The audience of nearly 200 people were all asked to keep their hands up as Dr Bird kept increasing the number of hours achieved. Most people had their hand up at the 30 minute point. Half the people put their hand down at one hour. Only twenty people still had their hands up at the two hour mark. I was one of only six people left with their hands up as achieving more than three hours moderate exercise.

When asked to explain how I’d managed to fit so much exercise into my working day my reply was simple ” I play golf every day and support others to enjoy the game too”.

Here’s the link to Dr Bird’s full presentation. It’s the most compelling argumentation ever as to why GOLF FITERIX should be socially prescribed and made more accessible to families throughout the UK.

Proving that golf is good for carers too

In a week when the focus has been on the challenges facing carers, it’s timely that a research study will start tomorrow at Lincoln Golf Centre to look at the impact our golf sessions have on the lives of carers.

Sociology students from The University of Lincoln will be conducting a study into the difference our golf sessions make to the lives of carers as well as looking at the wider societal impact of our service.

It’s part of an ongoing partnership with the university that has already provided invaluable evidence on the power of our golf therapy. When discussing the options for future projects we wanted to find an area of our social impact that was still to be fully evaluated. We all agreed “let’s research the impact it’s having on the carers and their families”

Tomorrow will see the research begin with the final report being published later this year.

Without wanting to pre-empt the final report, I’m going to share with you my gut instinct as to what some of the findings will be. You don’t spend four years working with families living with dementia without getting an intimate understanding of the challenges they face and the reasons as to why you have become such an important part of their lives.

So here we go….

  • Trustworthy
  • Reliable
  • Priceless
  • They don’t need to be there
  • It’s provided breathing space
  • They have made new friends and support networks
  • They can now consider doing things they enjoy themselves
  • They can keep working
  • We involve them
  • They know that their loved one is having a good time
  • Improved outlook on life
  • Chance to share challenges and problems
  • Not judgemental

As you can imagine I could continue and go through all the amazing case studies on the deep and meaningful impact of our golf sessions have had on the carers we support – but let’s wait for the findings from the research project.

When we initially started scoping the project I asked the students “how many of your families have been touched by dementia?” Seventy five percent put their hands up.. Say no more.

I was very taken by their passionate desire to get involved with our project and their professionalism in scoping the research.

After all the preparation, I can’t wait for tomorrow when I’ll have the chance to finally introduce the carers to the students.

My gut instinct on how this will go? I think you can guess the answer to this one. xxx

Hole In One Proves Golfing Dreams Can Come True

Walt Disney famously said “if you can dream it, you can do it”. When I started Golf In Society three years ago I never dreamt that my golfers would have three holes in one in a calendar year.  In the golfing world a hole in one is known as an “ace”.

On Wednesday at Rudding Park, Brenda became our third golfer to ace a hole. She hit a lovely 7 iron and one bounce later it was in the hole. For those of you that have achieved and ace you will know the sheer joy of the moment.

Brenda got the chance to sign the “hole in one hall of fame” book in the clubhouse, her name and achievement etched into golfing history for all to see. The wonderful memories of the day will stay with her for a lifetime.

For the golfers reading this you will know that some people play for a lifetime and never get a hole in one. To know that we’ve had three this year is nothing short of a minor miracle. This achievement is even more amazing when you consider that one of my hole in one golfers had never picked up a golf club before he joined us two years ago.

Rob, my first “hole in one hero” this year is a great example of how golf can transform a life. Rob has been diagnosed with PD and is challenged to control his movement and maintain his balance.

He was referred to us by a Parkinson’s nurse at Harrogate hospital. Improving muscle strength, balance and co-ordination are important aspects of living well with this neurological disease.

When Rob joined us we worked on his balance, posture and movement control. Once his confidence grew we introduced him to the golf swing. Building this confidence to swing a golf club was crucial. Interestingly, the more he concentrated on the golf swing the more controlled his movement became.

Here’s a photo of Rob preparing to swing a club during his first golf day with us.

20160525_144046

Rob has now been golfing with us for just over two years and has already achieved the incredible feat of having a hole in one. He now has his own set of clubs and trolley that he brings to every session. Rob would never have discovered how much golf had to offer him without programmes like ours. He’s so grateful for the support and new purpose we’ve given him.

It’s a perfect example of how a game that is regarded as too difficult for most people can be enjoyed when the right encouragement, coaching and support is made available.

We now have three “hole in one acers” in our golfing family and I’m sure there will be more joining them in the years ahead.

And finally, here’s a great photo of Rob and Brenda celebrating their incredible achievement. Priceless memories.

Hole In One Duo

 

 

 

Dementia-Friendly Golf Sessions Put Fun At The “Fore”

Here’s a lovely guest blog from the Alzheimer’s Society following a recent visit to see the special work we’re doing to support families living with dementia.
Recently, Programme Partnerships Officer Steven McFadyen visited people with dementia who enjoy playing sport and being active together. He is looking to support leisure centres, gyms and sports clubs to be more dementia-friendly.
Here, Steven shares his experience of visiting a group of golfers who are living with dementia. He learns why activities, such as golf, are important not just for the players, but also their carers and family members.

Golfers and volunteers at Lincoln Golf Centre after a fun morning of golf.

20180531_124449

What is Golf in Society?
I’d heard a lot about Golf in Society before I had the pleasure of visiting a golfing session in Lincoln.
This fantastic initiative is designed to give people living with dementia access to supported golf sessions in a local club.
By providing a person-centred approach, Golf in Society allows people with dementia to continue (or start) playing golf. They ensure the environment is safe, social and – most importantly – fun!
A social event
On a weekly basis, golfers come together and enjoy a welcoming session. They spend time on the driving range, on the putting green and out on the course.
It was wonderful to see the golfers greeting one another. Together they have a cup of tea, some lunch and enjoy being outside. It’s an ideal way to spend a morning for anyone that likes sport!
Initially, he didn’t want to go because he thought it was going to be competitive. There was an Alzheimer’s Society meeting at the golf club that opened him up to a conversation about golf. Then he came along and has loved it ever since.’
– Carer of person with dementia
Golf ‘fore’ all
While the golfers took part in a group warm-up on the driving range, I spoke with their carers in the café. We talked about the golfing sessions and dementia-friendly sporting clubs.
Sat around the table, the carers shared a sense of peer support. They told stories and explained how Golf in Society helps not only the golfers, but also the carers.
These weekly sessions provide the opportunity to create a support network for carers. The partners and family members told me how this three-hour activity gives them and the golfers much-needed time to do their own thing. They both have the chance to relax and do things they love. The carers felt this was a huge positive in their lives.
They felt these supported golfing sessions have given their loved ones with dementia a new lease of life. It is something to look forward to every week that helps to increase social confidence and improve physical fitness.
His fitness has improved enormously. He used to use the buggy to get around the course and now he walks and carries his own golf bag. We’ve even started doing our own walks too.’
– Wife and carer of person with dementia

Team photo with Golf in Society Founder, Anthony Blackburn.

IMG_20180816_122502
Out on the golfing range
It was great to watch the golfers in action. Golf in Society maintains structure and consistency to the regular sessions. This is found to be beneficial for the participants with dementia.
I watched some target practice on the driving range where there were plenty of jokes and smiles.
We headed to the putting green where golfers took on long and short putt challenges. Then, they played a few holes on the course to make the most of the sunshine.
It’s given my Dad a new lease of life.’
– Daughter of person with dementia
A positive experience
Throughout the morning, golfers enjoyed the challenges, teamwork, high-fives and celebratory air-punches.
The differing levels of golfing experience didn’t matter. The session brought so much fun, laughter and positive experiences for everyone involved.
For the people living with dementia, this wasn’t about their diagnosis. It was about golf. It would be brilliant to see more projects take on a similar model and create dementia-friendly initiatives in their sports clubs.
I don’t even think he registers it’s about his dementia, which is great, and it’s not about dementia. For him, it’s just about golf.’
– Wife and carer of person with dementia

unnamed8i0vraqq

 

 

Golf Goes Head To Head With Dementia

Crowd wave

This article was recently featured by the National Carers Association in their newsletter that goes to over 2000 people involved in the independent care sector. I hope you enjoy the read.

Dementia is a growing crisis in society. In this special report, we look at Anthony Blackburn, social entrepreneur and the founder of Golf in Society and explain his efforts to make a difference in the lives of people living with dementia and Parkinson’s disease by using the unique attractions of golf.
Every Thursday morning for the last three years, light permitting, Anthony Blackburn has headed out first thing to play nine holes of golf at Lincoln Golf Centre.
Later on that morning he and his team will welcome a bunch of eager recipients to one of his dementia focused golf sessions. After his nine holes, he goes to his car office and prepares another day of development for his social enterprise – Golf in Society. He has approximately two hours, (depending on how he has played his round) to not only make early contact with the ever growing myriad of partners and stakeholders involved in his project but is also mindful of who his attendees are that morning and what he needs to do to make their day special. Lincoln is just one of his centres of excellence.

Moving off the tee

With an impressive care background and equally inspirational approach to people living with dementia and Parkinson’s disease, Anthony has no truck with people who have to live with these conditions being told that their golfing lives are over. He believes that too many golf clubs have turned their backs on members who have spent a lifetime supporting them and its an attitude that has to change. He states “Gone are the days of waiting lists for most clubs and if clubs realised their investments in these lapsed members, they would be contributing to the social good for their locality”.
Anthony even has many examples of clients who had never hit a golf ball before. Put simply, we golfers are all aware of those precious moments when we are playing golf, that we fool ourselves into thinking we know exactly what we are doing with body, club and ball and it feels great but we also know it won’t last too long. He decided that by using golf, he was going to help people feel that moment when perhaps they had forgotten it was possible ever to do so again.
As a carer, he has always looked for ways of providing mental and physical stimulation to make his clients’ days better and whilst he still uses golf to unwind for himself, (we all do don’t we?) he realised that there was absolutely no reason why people with so called limited cognitive skills couldn’t be helped to maintain them or, who knows, get them back? It wasn’t exactly a light bulb moment but certainly it was akin to finding not one but maybe two brand new ProV1’s nestling together in the rough. We all know what that means. A quick look round for errant tee shots and they’re in the bag.

Food for thought.

There are seven stages to dementia. Why do you, the reader, need to know this?
Here are some surlyn proof facts for you. Current statistics are that there are 850,000 people living with dementia in the UK. In addition, it is estimated by the Alzheimer’s Society that 45% of people who are likely to have the condition, haven’t been diagnosed yet. For reasons of guilt, denial, ignorance and other circumstances.
There are no grey areas with dementia. If it is part of your life either as somebody living with it, or as a carer, it dominates every aspect of your daily living. The chances are that if you haven’t come across the condition on a personal or professional level, you have no idea what that entails.
Such is the emotional turmoil the condition engenders, there are many health experts calling for national minimum wages for family member carers. This might have something to do with the estimation that it costs the government £1.2 billion in lost taxes and making social care payments to people who are cheaper than the NHS and care homes, but it seems some greens are difficult to read easily.
But just to get back to the figures momentarily, imagine that for every one of those 850,000 people in the UK living with dementia, there are at least another six people (family members and professionals) involved in their care programmes either directly or indirectly. Add in the undiagnosed, and you have at least nine million people in the UK trying to get on the first tee. With 15% of our population dedicated to dealing with dementia, it’s a fair assumption that a similar percentage are members of golf clubs, or used to be. Given the age profiles for a lot of clubs, the chances are that they are higher. There is a growing body of clinical evidence that shows that the early longer gestation periods of dementia (stages one to four) can be increased by good diet, a level of regular exercise and plenty of mental stimulation. Golf and Health’s outstanding installations at this year’s Open Championship at Carnoustie is a green light as to how the medical industry is beginning to approach the situation for our elder citizens.
There is unlikely to be a clinical cure for dementia for at least two decades. That’s going to be too late for the people needing help now and for some time to come.
Whilst cancer research receives ten times the investment versus finding the answer for curing dementia and Parkinson’s (and all power to its elbow for their extraordinary success rate in treatments), it is likely that we are on our own in dealing with the day to day lifestyles we have to adopt for our family members.
Who’s listening?
But it’s not just the medical industry that buys into what Golf in Society is doing. Over the last two years, Anthony has developed working relationships with the European Tour, England Golf, Rudding Park GC, Lincoln Golf Centre, Mearns Castle Golf Academy near Glasgow, the Golf & Health project, Life Changes Trust, UnLtd, Howard Swann at Golf Business International and the Alzheimer’s Society. All these organisations recognise the opportunities that exist to make lives better for people living with dementia and Parkinson’s and also that there are business benefits to be had for all if the fourteen clubs in the bag are clean and ready for use.
There is another analogy to make here. The putter and the carer. Officially, your putter should be taking care of about 40% of the shots in your round. If you are living with dementia, you depend on your carer totally. The carer, very often a family member, is the one club in your bag that you can’t do without, day or night. But when Anthony runs his sessions, he supplies a new putter that enables the weary putter some time to recuperate and recharge the batteries for the inevitable crazy putting course later on in the day.
In an encouraging development recently, our new Secretary of State for Health and Social Care, Matt Holland, has pledged £4.5 million to the concept of social prescribing by general practitioners. This idea has been around for a number of years now, and GP’s recognise the benefits of using social prescribing in dealing with their workload and helping their patients. The media announced the news with main headlines of people getting involved in gardening and cookery courses to help avoid being prescribed drugs to alleviate their symptoms and in general just using common sense to “feeling better”. Many of these sorts of courses take time (and money) to set up but with golf and the available facilities all over the UK, all you have to do is just pitch up and hit the ball.
Feedback and the future
Anthony sees golf as a perfect addition to these various activities and is passionate about the effects he sees day in day out with his Golf in Society “Golf Days Out” sessions. Here are just a few examples of the sort of feedback he receives: “I can’t get him to a day centre, but I can’t stop him coming here”, “He’s happier and he’s more relaxed so I’m more relaxed, it’s priceless from my point of view to see him happy and doing something because he was always so active” and “They help each other on the golf course so you have this chap with dementia helping another chap with dementia….. they know how each other feels”. A further comment really hit home to Anthony recently from Alan at Lincoln Golf Centre…. “I remember now why I enjoy golf so much”. Obviously it was nothing to do with the fact that he had just won the monthly Texas Scramble competition. Pure joy from Alan. Strike a chord with anybody?
Danny Walsh, Senior Lecturer (Mental Health Nursing) at the University of Lincoln chips in with his views “This is a marvellous initiative, which is likely to make a significant and very positive impact upon the lives of those people living with dementia and their carers who take part in it. The University is proud to be evaluating this venture from an academic and medical point of view, but I have seen the pleasure and grins on the faces of the participants and that’s about as good an evaluation as you can get”.
Anthony’s plans are ambitious and like the good caddies out there who know their charges well, they are infectious to those around him. He is currently applying through the relevant government departments to start a trial of local GP’s near his assigned centres of excellence to encourage social prescribing. Training programmes are being prepared for clubs to not only be dementia friendly but run his courses on a regular basis for lapsed members or any local residents who fancy some easy cost effective respite. A policy of adult safeguarding is being prepared to help clubs instigate his programmes and he is well aware of the potential financial implications for clubs that adopt Golf in Society policies. The blueprint that can be created to facilitate a network of “age-friendly” golf clubs throughout the UK already exists and surely it’s just a matter of time before we see his concept at clubs everywhere.
A bit like defibrillators possibly?
The importance of holing out well
Throughout his caring career, Anthony has always believed in the old notion of treating people as you would expect to be. His team are reminded regularly to treat their clients as if they were helping their own fathers or grandfathers and he believes it’s an approach that pays off in all his sessions.

As he states, ” I see golf leading the way in person-centred sports coaching for people living with dementia and Parkinson’s and from what I have experienced in the growth of the concept, it’s the utter joy of not only the participants but also their carers, many of whom rely on our sessions to keep them sane”. This is not an understatement.
The cathartic nature of getting involved in the fearful world of dementia is demonstrated by the thousands of people worldwide who have had personal experience of it and are now leaders all over the world in social care with their research and knowledge on the subject and are keen to make sure their stories are told to help others. Mr Blackburn senior was a great judge of pace and direction when it came to his putting and Anthony uses his Dad’s putter all the time because he knows it gives him inspiration in the dark arts of the wand. It’s no accident that he is a very good putter. A fact about which he is extremely proud.
If you, your club or anybody you know needs help or further information about Golf in Society and its mission for the future, visit http://www.golfinsociety.com . Alternatively, call Anthony on 07491 694938. He’s very happy to take your call and if you have to leave a message, it’s probably because he has a club in his hand and is chatting to somebody who needs some help. Or he could be reminiscing about his Dad on the practice putting green.

img_0532

 

Golf Finally On The Health Agenda

It’s taken a long time to get golf onto the health agenda of policy makers. Today we finally got a great mention during “Health Questions” in Parliament.

A few weeks ago I was invited by the golf & health project to present our work to health minister Steve Brine at Wentworth. Steve was very impressed with our project, especially how we had engaged successfully with vulnerable adults and people who had never considered playing golf.

It was great to get the chance to prove how golf can be used to facilitate healthy ageing, especially in families touched by dementia and Parkinson’s disease.

At a time when policy makers are looking for new ways to integrate health and social care and keep our ageing population living well for longer, it was the perfect opportunity to prove how golf can play it’s part.

Our SINGLE INTERVENTION addresses at least FOUR SOCIAL CHALLENGES, cutting across  four government agendas, health, social, community and sport.

To be more specific…

Our three hour golf sessions improve physical, mental and social wellbeing whilst providing carers with priceless respite support. At present it would take at least four separate interventions to deliver the support that we provide in a single one.

Our single intervention is a fraction of the cost of the current health & care interventions available to families and it delivers higher quality, longer-lasting outcomes..

This is why we are so proud to be proving the power of using golf to facilitate healthy ageing, especially at a time when new thinking and radical approaches are needed to solve the social timebombs facing local communities…

Here’s the link to dialogue in parliament today.

Minister hails health benefits of golf

Dementia & Golf Research Released By University of Lincoln

In a week when the whole world is focussed on taking action to support families living with dementia and finding a cure for this devastating disease, it seems fitting to share with you an excellent dementia research project produced by students from the University of Lincoln.

In partnership with Golf In Society, Lincoln Golf Centre and with the excellent support of our dementia golfers and their carers, this excellent piece of research has been produced by final year sport’s science students.

The report makes very interesting reading and is the first in a wave of planned research projects that will be conducted in partnership with the University of Lincoln. Each research project will produce even deeper and detailed findings about the health, social and community impact of  using sport as a meaningful intervention in dementia care.

The more evidence-based research we gather, the sooner we can use it to influence health & social care stakeholders to embrace pioneering interventions like ours..

Here’s the link to the full report… Hope you find it of interest.

Dementia Project Report

 

Golf gives a sense of purpose to dementia lives.

I find it tragic that so many golfers are forced to give up the game they love when diagnosed with dementia. I can understand why, but that doesn’t make it acceptable.

Put yourself in the shoes of a golfer who has just been diagnosed, which I often do.

Trying to deal with the devastating news that you have a terminal disease must be hard enough, but to then realise that your golfing days are numbered, especially for a person who’s life has revolved around their local club must be heart-breaking.

Just when their golf club, their “home away from home” needs to show compassion and encouragement that golf can still be enjoyed, all too often the reverse happens.

Too many golfers diagnosed with dementia are leaving the game early because the golf industry has not grasped the issue of how to engage and retain these life-long supporters of golf throughout their dementia journey.

With over 400 dementia golf days successfully delivered, I think we’ve earned the right to have a voice on this issue.

Everyone needs a sense of purpose in life. It’s no different for people with dementia. Arguably it’s even more important.

It’s not just ethically & socially the right thing to do, it’s critical to providing happier & healthier outcomes for families living with dementia. Interestingly, it could also be the lifeline that golf clubs need to survive and thrive.

If you consider that the average age of a club member is about 55 and that one in three people over 65 will develop dementia you can see the potential impact on club membership. However, it also provides a unique opportunity for those clubs willing to embrace dementia.

This week we’ve proved our commitment to transforming this tragic situation by supporting dementia golfers in Lincoln, Harrogate & Glasgow to have a great day out at their local golf club, just like they did before dementia came knocking at their door.

The good news is that golf clubs are busier and families are happier as a result of hosting & embracing our golf days.

When you watch the videos below you will see why our work is so rewarding and why we’re so passionate about educating the golf industry to embrace dementia across the UK aand beyond.

Golf is proving to be that sense of purpose that our customers needed in their life.